Posted in Uncategorized

Bullied Out of Japan: Part 3 (Final)

Savvy Kenya in Japan

Once I understood the depth of what was happening (see part one and two here), I ended talked to many people, both Japanese and non-Japanese. Their experiences and advice opened my eyes to the truth about the Japanese society that produces a self-policing community. I am not an expert on Japanese culture. However, there is a collective agreement that bullying is particularly vicious in Japanese schools. There are studies upon studies. This culture extends to the workplace, where the spirit of stoicism and “not causing trouble” philosophy are enforced. Until people just can’t take it any more, and walk onto the tracks of the passing trains. Suicides are pretty common in Japan. Including teen suicides and kids in elementary school. See article: Two former classmates ordered to pay ¥37 million in damages over bullied Japanese boy’s suicide. If you don’t want to “cause trouble” with your suicide (your…

View original post 1,200 more words

Posted in Uncategorized

Bullied Out of Japan: Part 2

Savvy Kenya in Japan

So here we were in Tokyo, almost 6 months later. I had thought we were well settled in. I had found a very nice Nigerian lady to do my hair, and Jeremy would play with her two kids while she worked her magic. I was even having a semblance of a social life, going out dancing once in a while with Vivi, my Italian friend and coworker. I was dating a nice Frenchman (😘 😘Chris, keep on being full of light) in his 30’s who would bring me salad and play living room soccer with Jeremy.

And then the teacher called me on September 20th, 2019.

She asked me if Jeremy had changed his behaviour at home, and I said no. Everything was normal at home. He would come…

View original post 2,616 more words

Posted in Uncategorized

Bullied Out of Japan: Part 1

Savvy Kenya in Japan

Warning: this post will be long, that’s why I am dividing it into three parts. I have already talked about the contents of this post in the interview with the Black Experience in Japan channel on YouTube.

Writing this series of posts is having to relive the pain of the experience and that’s why I have been avoiding it for over 5 months now. But writing is cathartic, therapeutic even… so here we are, finally.

Before you read this, it is important to get some context and background. I came to Japan in October 2014 on a fully funded scholarship, courtesy of the Japanese government. The scholarship covers everything including a flight ticket, tuition and a monthly stipend at your university of choice in Japan. It was a great opportunity for me to do my PhD, and experience a new culture, having never lived elsewhere except in East Africa.

View original post 1,935 more words

Posted in Uncategorized

Taking a Break and Doing NaNoWriMo

For those of you who are only tuning in now, I’ve had a dream since I was a wee kiddo to be a novelist. Oddly enough, I’ve had this dream since I was about eleven, around the same time I fell in love with Japan. Coincidence?…Probably, yeah.

Anyways, I’ve started on the novel already. I’ve written over 20,000 words, I know how it’s supposed to end, so now I just need to sit down to get it done.

So I’ll be off this site until November! If you want to follow the NaNoWriMo journey, I’m making a new blog for just the novel, because I hate the new format of the NaNoWriMo website with a burning passion.

Posted in Reviews and Rants, Uncategorized

Dear #Facebook, Why Are There No #LGBTQ Options in Page Categories?

For those of you unaware, I’ve got my own Facebook Page. Today I was going over to post my previous blog post up on it when Facebook decides to pop up with, “Add a category so more people can find you!”

I sighed and went over there. Generally, I hate these stupid pop ups, because those damn message numbers won’t go away until you do as the Facebook gods command. I make my way over and try to put in something else.

When I started typing, I figured, “Alright fine, I’ll put in Japan or Japanese.”

Nope. The only option available was…Japanese restaurant. Nanidafuq? I was very confused, but figured whatever, I’ll just put my own category in. On most other websites, you can customize your category, kind of like creating your own tags and categories on blogs and vlogs.

NOPE, not allowed. “Only specific categories can be used!” It says, taunting me.

I gave up, and then I figured, “Well that’s a little racist, but whatever, I’ll just type in LGBT or LGBTQ and be done with it.”

NOPE, not allowed.

“You have got to be kidding me.” I said and quickly typed in “Facebook List of Page Categories” into Google.

As it turns out, LGBTQ isn’t in there AT ALL. It’s not even listed under the “Causes” section.

I was flabbergasted. Surely it had to be under something? I scrolled down. Generally speaking, LGBTQ gets lumped in under “community” or “causes” on most websites. Under community organizations I found the goddamned armed forces, but not LGBTQ.

And how is a COUNTRY CLUB a community organization?!

I could believe it. I searched for gay, lesbian, trans, bi, ANYTHING in the umbrella. Gay Bar was literally the only option I could find. At this point in the game, I got a bit pissed off.

It almost seems deliberate. Let’s think about this for a second, this is a company that has been called out for not doing enough to protect people from fake news, neo-nazis, and etc. And then I come to find out that there are literally NO options for LGBTQ spaces in the page options?

You might be going like, “What’s the big deal?” Well the big deal is that without that option, search engines won’t bring people to those pages. If you search for “LGBTQ resources in New York” you won’t get any links for the Facebook Groups unless it’s in the title. Searches means money, searches means awareness, and in some cases it means finding the right resources if a teen kid kicked out of our house by homophobic parents.

I think I got really pissed off when I reached the “website” section, which is under “Other.” It lists “E-commerce,” like for real?! And above that is “Vitamins/Supplements” but screw that huge population that needs all the support it can get for visibility and help.

And under “Cause” there is literally NOTHING.

And I might not have even been this pissed off if I didn’t know that Facebook has it’s own Facebook LGBTQ Page! That is some bullshit. Why does this company get to profit off of LGBTQ people, but then turn around and erase it from its search options?

I’m not even accepting, “Well, it must just be an oversight.” I don’t believe it for a second. This lack of LGBTQ in categories feels deliberate. I cannot be the first person to have noticed and brought it up.

And maybe, just maybe, I wouldn’t have been so mad if I could’ve just put my own category in, but I wasn’t allowed. Only Facebook approved categories allowed, because screw you that’s why.

This needs to change, and there does also need to be better categories for people on an international level. There are other countries, languages, and cultures that deserve to have their communities represented and found. The fact you only get restaurant options for diversity is appalling and disgusting.

Fix this issue!

Posted in Talking about Books, Uncategorized

Talking About Books: I Started Writing Books Early, but Then…

When I was about 12 years old, I wrote my first book. Well, it was a novella really (I think my memory says about 30,000 words). I was absolutely thrilled with it at the time. Looking back, I’m fairly certain my English teacher must’ve been a little traumatized and horrified that a 12 year old girl was, well, kind of writing pornographic content for an official assignment.

My dream was to be romance writer, because I loved the idea of romantic love. Someone who is always there for you, someone who never betrayed you, and someone who would save you from your own flaws…Romance novels don’t exactly set you up for realistic expectations in relationships, but I digress.

Then, I fell in love with fantast and science fiction. I plowed through the entirety of Lord of the Rings, Animorphs, Enders Game series, Harry Potter, Inuyasha, Fushigi Yugi, just pick your choice of late 90’s and early 2000’s manga really, and because of that I changed my mind. I would be a fantasy writer, or a sci fi writer instead. There would be books with romantic elements, but they’d be a bit more realistic.

But then in high school, I dove into horror and mystery. I was going to the public library and just checking out literally anything with vampires or murder in the plot. Interview with a Vampire, the Vampire Diaries (I liked it before it was cool, kids), hated Nancy Drew though, and just kind…snowballed from there.

Suddenly, I realized I kind of liked anything fictional. I didn’t like mystery as much as the others, but I wanted to read everything. In addition, I kind of wanted to write everything. You might even notice that problem with my blog. One day I’m talking about super important LGBTQIA+ issues, and then the next I’m doing a think piece about teaching students.

But I also got discouraged. A lot of my English teachers would read my work, and then they wouldn’t really be excited as I was for anything I wrote. I got the feeling that other students (a few of whom I know actually just kind of plagiarized their work, by the way) were often more encouraged and well liked by the English teachers. I guess what I’m saying is I never had anyone besides my mother and brother who believed in this dream, so it was hard to think I could have a future in it during high school.

When I got into university, I figured I would try to get myself published in something before I graduated. I knew I would have to buckle down and study hard, but I continually worked on various manuscripts throughout the four years I went there. I was a part of two small writing groups even, trying my best to keep this going. I wrote so much stuff, but none of it felt like it was “ready” or “polished” or whatever.

It didn’t help that, once again, there was no professor or anyone who thought my writing was any good. I was passable, as in I was able to make papers and submit them and get good enough grades that I could pass classes. At the same time, if I ever mentioned the other things I was trying to write, I kind of got dismissed.

My poetry wasn’t “on the level” that the other students could produce. My short stories seemed lack that “thing” they were looking for, and I don’t know, I kind of gave up showing anyone above other students what I was working on. Oddly enough, the writing groups and my own roommates kept me going on writing.

I want to be clear, my professors weren’t monsters by any stretch of the imagination. I learned a lot from them on how to write better. I was forced to read and write outside of my comfort zone often, and it really made an impact on how I viewed fiction as remnants of history, not just stories. I never realized there were whole debates and massive conferences about certain novels or works of literature because they were integral to the history of certain genres.

My professors also taught me something that no one really taught how to do well before: self-edit. Up until university, I think most of the time “editing” for middle and high school teachers mostly focused on spelling and grammar. I get it, it’s hard to teach kids how to edit more for style and tone. As a middle and high school teacher, believe me I do get it. All the same, all of my professors were merciless in the rewriting process, and I’m super thankful for all their effort. Now I write and re-write and re-write and revise all the damn time.

By the time graduation arrived, I managed to publish one poem in the school literary journal. It was about my grandfather, and I was very proud of it. I also write in the school newspaper all four years, although in my head that “didn’t really count,” and I was a page editor in my senior year. Still, I hated myself a little bit for not getting a book out there.

Then I came to Japan, and honestly blogging was something I thought would just be nice to try out. It was a good hobby to have, and I figured maybe one day I would publish a book about life in Japan or something. I still kept writing here and there, but having a full time job means of course there is less time for novel endeavors.

I kept saying “Oh I’ll definitely do it this year!” and “I’ll get it done by (insert date here)!” But it kept not happening, and not happening, and not happening.

I wish I could say something profound happened, like someone just snapped me into talking about the book or I came to this amazing realization, but that’s not how it came to be. I just read randomly online one day on a Facebook writing group that if you’re an adult, there’s never going to be a “right” time to get published. Just do it or you’ll regret it later. And then I read somewhere else that talking about your book helps you to write your book, and it helps keep you accountable to an audience.

It’s all kind of accumulated to a point now where I’m also, well, pretty goddamn sure my writing is worthy of garnering some kind of audience. I don’t need to be that next big thing. Basically, I’m thirty and I don’t feel like I have to prove myself to anyone anymore. I’m not asking permission, either, I’m self-publishing and doing it all myself. Fuck the system (insert fist pump here). I’ve never been a person who has waited around to be told where my life should be going, why should this any different?

And so here we go. I’m going to write a novel, there is no deadline. It’s happening at some point, hopefully this year. I’ll be working on it, you’ll be getting to read excerpts and things as I go. Enjoy!

Posted in Uncategorized

3 Places to Connect with LGBT+ Community in Hiroshima City

Hiroshima’s LGBTQIA+ things!! I’m so happy to see we’re getting some highlights of things to do and see there.

Easy Landings

Hi guys, I’m reposting an article I wrote for Wide Island View, a Hiroshima JET Program Zine, in April 2019 which has since moved to a new site. I’ll be sharing this link as it’s new home, however you can also find this article on the Hiroshima JET Program WordPress. Thanks! 

If you’re reading this article, I imagine you and I have something in common. We are part of the queer community in some way or other, be it through our sexual orientation, gender identity, friends or chosen family in the queer community, or perhaps you just have questions. One of the things I looked forward to most when I came to Japan was seeing and experiencing the queer community in Japan. This article is to give you a heads up on what I’ve seen so far, and what kinds of places you can visit to connect with the queer…

View original post 1,162 more words